Without hiding their pride, the people of Split will tell you that their city is "the most beautiful one in the world and beyond". You better not discuss this with them for well spirited Split will convince you in this as soon as you discover it! This for ever young city with the population of about 200,000 that give it its warm Mediterranean temper, has lived its urban rhythm for as long as 1700 years, with its heart in the Diocletian Palace and its soul widespread to embrace you.Ever since the life of the city protected by the UNESCO and entered into the register of the World Cultural Heritage has been writing the history of this unique capital of Dalmatia.
The city of Split is situated in the warmest region of the northern Mediterranean coast, in the very centre of the Adriatic eastern coast and in the immediate vicinity of the rivers Jadro and Žrnovnica that have been watering it for 1700 years. Its mild climate, with 2700 sunny hours per year, makes it an oasis where, sheltered from the wind, one can enjoy the sun even in wintertime. The industrial, university, and business centre of the region nourishes its "green soul" on the hill Marjan situated in the westernmost part of the peninsula. Its forested park infringed by the city and the sea offers pleasant walks away from the city noise under the pines by the sea.
(SOURCE: tz Split)

 

Split is the largest Dalmatian city, the second-largest urban centre in Croatia, and the seat of Split-Dalmatia County. The city is located on the shores of the Mediterranean, more specifically on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea, spreading over a central peninsula and its surroundings, with its metropolitan area including the many surrounding seaside towns as well. An intraregional transport hub, the city is a link to the numerous surrounding Adriatic islands and the Apennine peninsula, as well as a popular tourist destination.
Split is also one of the oldest cities in the area, and is traditionally considered just over 1,700 years old, while archaeological research relating to the ancient Greek colony of Aspálathos (6th century BC) establishes the city as being several hundred years older.
The ancient city is named after the Spanish Broom (brnistra or žuka in modern Croatian), a common shrub in the area. The 6th century BC Greek colony of Aspálathos  or Spálathos , from which the city originates, was named after the common plant. As the city became a Roman possession, the Latin name became "Spalatum", which in the Middle Ages evolved into "Spalatro" in the Dalmatian language of the city's Roman population. The South Slavic version became "Split", while the Venetian italianized version was "Spalato". During the 19th century, the name was "Spljet", and finally "Split" once more.
Thus, contrary to popular belief, the name "Spalatum" has nothing to do with the Latin word for palace, palatium (thought to be a reference to Diocletian's Palace, which forms the core of the city). The erroneous etymology was notably due to Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus, and was later reaffirmed by Thomas the Archdeacon.
(SOURCE: en.wikipedia)

 


Split's main beach is Bacvice, mostly sandy beach famous of "Picigin" game, a game played with a small ball in shallow water. It is urban, central city beach, situated few minutes' walk south past the railway station. The beach has lifeguards, life-saving equipment, first-aid, facilities for disabled, renting facilities, catering facilities, showers, lockers, recycable waste facilities, parking lot.
Bacvice is backed by a number of restaurants, café bars and nightclubs all lined up and easy to walk to. Club O'Hara is a famous hangout with dancing untill dawn.
The beach has been awarded with the Blue Flag.
(SOURCE: croatia-beaches.com)

  • Split, Croatia - About Split - Photo 1
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